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employees. >>> breaking news overnight. u.s. and allied forces bomb libyan targets as "operation odyssey dawn" is under way. and moments ago, we got new word on the success of the campaign so far. >>> and new word from libya's leader this morning as well, as antiaircraft fire from gadhafi forces, they lit up the skies of tripoli throughout the night there. >>> the day's other big story, fallout from the japanese quake even a week after the tsunami. this new and frightening video is surfacing. the very latest from there in moments. good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." we begin with breaking news. >>> new word from the top u.s. military chief just moments ago. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news a no-fly zone is in effect in libya this morning after american and european forces rained down missiles on libya's defenses. the u.s. and britain unleashed 114 tomahawk cruise missiles targeting libyan surface-to-air sites as well as radar and communications centers. three american b-2 stealth bombers also dropped more than 40 bombs on libyan defenses. now, the goal of
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technolo
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
developments on two big stories. is the u.s. preparing to bomb libya? the u.n.'s major decision to protect libyan civilians from the gadhafi regime. >>> and also the race to stop a nuclear disaster in japan. today's desperate emergency action to stop an all outright meltdown. it is friday, march 18th. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. >>> military action against libya could happen in just a matter of hours. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's son interviewed exclusively with abc news is now responding and is as defiant as ever. >>> and as nuclear crisis escalates in japan, the west coast of the united states is now on alert already monitoring radiation levels there. >> it's funny, too, because they say they have those monitors up already. in seattle, your hometown, will be the first place to know if a wave does hit us. >> and the epa will be watching that closely. that's for sure. >>> we do begin with the dramatic decision to take military action in libya. the u.n. security council voted just hours ago. >> and now the u.s., france, britain and other countries ar
by general electric. 23 are now in operation across the u.s. >> this is the system that has proved unreliable. >> paul gunter tells wjz, the aging mark 1 design is unsafe and should be shut down. >> it represents not only a bad design but an aging facility. any number of events could be the match that lights the next nuclear fire. >> reporter: but a spokesman for peach bottom says comparing fukushima to his plant is problematic. but peach bottom has more numerous safety inspections. and the tsunami caused many of the problems at fukushima, an event unlikely to happen here. >> please stay indoors with your windows closed. >> reporter: advocates also point to lessons learned from the partial meltdown on nearby three-mile island in 2009. saying the industry is now safer. >> the actions taken by the industry since 3-mile island has prepared us to deal with events just like japan and maybe even worse. >> reporter: japan's nuclear crisis, has caused concern. >> that's just something you deal with every day. it makes you think twice when you hear the sirens go off. >> it doesn't need to be a tsunami
stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
officials are saying about u.s. involvement in libya. a live look now at the night sky in libya. a u.s. f-15 crashes today. and right now, an investigation is wrapping up. joel brown reports for wjz on what brought that plane down. >> reporter: all that is left of the f-15 that crashed in libya, is this burned-out shell. witnesses say the two american pilots who were ejected safely, were greeted as heroes. the pentagon blames equipment failure for the crash. the two pilots aren't badly hurt and are back in american hands. it's the first major loss that u.s. officials are calling a success. >> virtually all of our targets are isolated. >> reporter: they launched another 24 missile at gadhafi's compound today. and they extended the no-fly zone over eastern libya. the u.s. is eager to hand over control of the operation. >> a transfer within a few days is likely. >> reporter: it's still not clear just who the u.s. will turn over control to. either britain, france, or nato forces could take over. still, many rebels say the job is far from done. >> reporter: the loosely- organized group of rebels,
be harmful here in the united states or any of the u.s. territories. i will turn it over to dan then. >> thank you and good morning. we have continued working very hard in consultation with our great friends and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so ind
. >> thank you, jade. >>> we're also monitoring a briefing happening right now in washington, d.c. now, u.s. nuclear experts are part of the briefing. we're gone bring you their analysis. there you see a live picture. we'll bring you their latest analysis coming up at 7:30. >>> 7:50. today, japan's prime minister in a national tv address called on the japanese people to reunite in rebuilding the country from scratch. also today, japan increased the alert of its nuclear crisis from level 4 to level 5 on a scale of 7. fire trucks sprayed water on overheated reactors at the nuclear plant again today, trying to prevent a meltdown and there's still -- they are still frantically trying to install a power line to the plant, hoping to get the cooling systems working again. it's now been exactly one week since the disastrous quake and tsunami rocked japan. several hours ago, survivors all across that country marked this tragedy with a moment of silence. >>> and the death toll from the japanese quake and tsunami disaster keeps climbing to staggering levels. the latest casualty numbers show 6500 are c
is the u.s. on the sidelines? >> don't tell me we can't do a no-fly zone over tripoli. >> sean: john edwards may be indicted soon. we are on the road to 2012, hannity starts right here, right now. tonight president obama's views on the tea party in america has been exposed.ç stunning excerpts from a new book reveal the president's belief that racism was in fact a deep seated motivation of the movement. the absurd assessment can be found in family of freedom, presidents and african-americans in the white house. according to the book at a private white house dinner in may of 2010 the president explained that race was wobbly a key component in the rising opposition to his presidency from conservatives, especially right wing activists in the tea party movement. rather than dispute that notion, president obama agreed and reportedly called racism the subterranean agenda of the movement. without a shred of evidence the president has no problem labeling the tea party as racist. in recent years he's been quick to if forgive racially insensitive remarks made by some on the left. remember whe
taliban situation for the u.s. what is the worst case scenario? >> libya has been very strong having its young men go overseas to fight in islamic insurgency, balkans, chechnya, especially ir rack when the height of the fighting was there. those that don't get killed go home. i think the core of the resistance, whatever little military ability they have is probably made up by people elsewhere we would call mujahadeen. so it's a dicey proposition to be getting involved with this. i'm not sure that the opposition, if it takes power, is going to be much better than was gadhafi. >> that's why you need to have the cia, i presume, in there vetting, as we said, who are these people? who are the elements funding or supporting them? who are politically the most palatable and least palatable among them, the white house saying no decision has been made. i have a question for you as a cia veteran, i guess. the fact that we even know about this, is that unusual? should where he just assume the cia in this sort of situation would, of course, be in there on the ground? >> you have to assume the preside
investors in the u.s. as we just discussed, oil prices keep on spiking up another 2.7% yesterday. this is the increase in oil closing at just under $100 a barrel here in the united states. it was higher than that last week, but it has been in that area for a while. as a result of that, take a look at what happened in stock markets. the dow took a big hit, down 168 points. we also heard from federal reserve chairman ben bernanke who expressed concern about the economic recovery if the price of oil keeps climbing. >>> also, democrats south of the border in wisconsin still staying away in illinois. and the governor of wisconsin unveiling his new state budget, which includes cuts to schools and local municipalities. and the protests will continue at the capitol. the governor planned to cut compensation and collective bargaining rights for union work sti ers. cnn's david mattingly is live in madison, wisconsin. any movement on either side? is there any hope of resolving this? or are we seeing more of the same today, david? >> well, kiran, we're approaching the two-week mark of that da
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
dead. it happened around 9 o-clock last night... inside "u-s fried chicken" along pennsylvania avenue. a 29 year neck.. and was prooonuced dead at shock trauma.the other person, shot in the leg is expected to recover.no ord on a suspect at thisstime. a ar crash leaves one perron around o clock on honeygo boulevard and ebenezer road in a light pole ... the passenger wws thrown from it.that person was pronounced dead at the scene.the driver is listed in serious conditon at the hospital. in baltimore... leaving him r badly brrised and scarred. scarred. some believe the child... 11 year-old tyshawn thomas kyle... was targeted because of his special needs. now... questions are emerging... about whh school administrators didn't step in sooner... to stop tttyshawn was attacked tuesday... by a feelow student in school.but his mother says hours passee... beeore she learned what had happened. 13:39:18 i feel hopeless because mm child ii crying to me mommy why mm why is it my fault what did i do... i have no answerssfor that it's unaccee unacceptable the school system later released a statement...
the individual investor. the u.s. attorney leading this charge, according to lawyers that we talk to that know him, they say he's just getting started. >> i see what he's done as nothing short of throwing a neutron bomb on to wall street. you know neutron bombs leave institutions intact but get rid of people. this man can't be corrupted. he's not looking for a political advantage. he's not looking to become a judge. he's not looking to become mayor of new york city. he's not looking for the next stop. >> reporter: a neutron bomb onto wall street. quite an image. some people think it need cleaning up. brooke, this is a criminal case, traditionally hard to win especially when talking about insider trading. the bar is very high, the prosecution will have to convince the jury that raj rajaratnam is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. they have their work cut out for them. >> as the bar is so high, part of the issue here in this kind of case you have the high-tech surveillance equipment, critical here. is it different, is it new for this kind of case, insider trading? >> reporter: well, it is a littl
europe needs to stop being naive ought play needs to --. how big is that for the u.s.. >> following the list there's a strong sense. i give a lot of credit to our european partners. we don't have any illusions about where the european publics are and the skepticism they have about this. but it is a way forward to the political and military strategy and this is a price our partners have played a role in slovenia and bosnia offering troops for afghanistan. this is the kind of thing we look for and we see the countries in the western balkans showing the will and determination and understanding, to share the burden of responsibility. >> they thought there was a problem, they made a harsh siege. what in your view to contribute more to the military situation whenever there is one rather than -- jobs in the united states and think it can do judgment in development work? >> i don't think europe thinks that. a friend of mine and somebody i'd meet every month to talk about nato collaboration. he has a job worry about defense commitments. and looking at issues of finance and the european union
, what do you think? caller: the u.s. should not interfere in the affairs of other countries without their expression. host: bobby, your thoughts? caller: absolutely not. we have had our own brave men and women killed as soldiers and contractors. i do not understand what is up with this obama. he wants his own historical war that he can win. we saw the same thing with bush. we are not the world's policeman. i do not know what it will take to learn this. complete, total rock bottom. why not bring out these unmanned aerial vehicles? host: giving you a feel for what is happening on the ground this morning, here is the associated press saying -- host: here is the front page of "the guardian" this morning. it says that britain backtracked over its military stance regarding libya last night. host: also, "the financial times" this morning, "alarm over libya." coastal los angeles, victor, a democrat, what do you think? caller: in the african continent we have different priorities. why not use these countries in africa? we have pushed most of the presidents of the african continent. it would
. in the u.s., they're not concerned so they lobby in a different direction. >> thank you. i will ask one more question. this is my second round. if you fast forward to today and look at the other end of the buchan, march 4, 2011, problems we have now, the chair has described moral hazard and the like. we talked about that. what did you do? i can anticipate your answers as i think you've given them, just to make it very clear on the record, what would you recommend march 4, 2011? >> briefly, first, i want to emphasize the things we have said. one, you need more capital. and that you need increasing capital has to be with the size of the bank's, the risk of too big to fail. it has to be that this distortion has to be eliminated. secondly, if you have a problem, you should play by the ordinary rules of capitalism. when you go into bankruptcy, you convert that to equity. it is really a version of the standard rules of capitalism. you look at the numbers back in citibank, they had enough long- term capital it was more than enough to manage them, more than we put in. the answer -- the resoluti
need the assistance of the u.s. and coalition forces in order to push back the advances of the libyan government troops, in particular when they were making the major advancement on benghazi, which officials here said would have cost the lives of tens of thousands of innocent civilians. will they need to be armed now in order to push gadhafi out? well, the president yesterday in one of those sit-down interviews again saying they're not ruling anything out or ruling anything in, but he said that question is being assessed. take a listen. >> one of the questions that we want to answer is, do we start getting to a stage where gadhafi's forces are sufficiently degraded where it may not be necessary to arm opposition groups, but we're not taking anything off the table at this point. >> reporter: now, aides here at the white house seem to feel that it there is progress being made there because of the pressure that's being applied in this phase two of the operation there, which is now being led by nato, brooke. >> because of the pressure being we know time is of the essence. so how long woul
. nato officially took over command of all air operations over libya from the u.s. the labor department releases weekly figures today on unemployment benefits. that release comes ahead of the big monthly report on the jobs market. finally, a new study says the cost of health care for retirees has gone down. the steady says that a 65-year- old couple retiring this year will need about $230,000 to cover medical expenses. last year, they would've needed $250,000. fidelity expects the projection to resume its upward trend. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> for more than four decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant, muammar gaddafi. he has denied his people's freedom, exploited their wealth, murdered opponents at home and abroad, and terrorized innocent people around the world. >> follow what leaders are saying about libya and how the process unfolded from the house and senate floor and from author leaders around the world, all online on the c-span video library. follow c-span on twitter. it is the fastest way to get updates as well as links to evens t
all that eager. there's a real debate, right? >> that's right, the u.s. has 727 million barrels sitting the in the strategic oil reserve. this is for emergencies only. take a look at the last time we did it, hurricane katrina, we tapped into 11 million barrels of oil. that only brought the price of gas down 3%. that's not enough to really hit home. it saves people probably about $10, george. 10 cents a gallon. >> all right, bianna, thanks very much. >>> the crisis in libya also affecting gas prices forces loyal to moammar gadhafi and the battle to key cities in libya. the obama administration is under growing pressure to stop the violence. martha raddatz is in washington with the latest. good morning. >>> good morning, robin. this is one of those growing crises where there are no easy answers and certainly no quick fixes. but that does not take the pressure off the administration. >> reporter: while rebels celebrated after pushing gadhafi's forces out of northern libya, this appears to be a fight no one is winning. a chess game that has stalled now prompting more calms for the u
odyssey dawn? were opposition forces in libya informed by the u.s., the u.k. or france about the existence of these war games which may have encouraged them to actions leading to greater repression and a humanitarian crisis? in short, was this war against gaddafi's libya planned? or was it a spontaneous response to the great suffering which gaddafi was visiting upon his opposition? congress hasn't even considered this possibility. nato, which has now taken over enforcement of the no-fly zone, has more from an organization which pledged mutual support to defend north atlantic states from aggression, they've moved from that to military operations reaching from libya to the chinese border in afghanistan. north atlantic treaty organization. we need to know and we need to ask what role french air force general and current supreme allied commander of nato for transportation may have played in the development of operation southern storm and in discussions with the u.s. and the expansion of the u.n. mandate into a nato operation. what has been the role of the u.s. african command and central comma
. the u.s. government now says robert levinson is alive and being held somewhere in southeast asia. it's asking iran for help reuniting levinson with his family. but iran says they know nothing. >>> the nfl and the players union have gone into overtime. they put another 24 hours on the clock to settle their labor dispute. midnight tonight is the new deadline for both sides to agree on the $9 billion revenue sharing package, or face the first work stoppage since 1987. >>> and airfares are taking off again. the major airlines are charging up to $20 more for round-trip domestic flights. it's the sixth time this year they've raised fares, thanks to high oil prices. >>> there's a major, new survey out on sex this morning. it shows abstinence is in. 28% say they have never had sexual contact with another person. many say, they're just too busy with other activities. >> it was another -- they never had that kind of thing. okay. >> okay. >> it's friday. >>> let's go -- happy friday. you were thinking it. >> fine. now, i have to take it. fine. good morning, everybody. and happy friday. let's ge
watching hannity last night, it was revealed late in the day yesterday that unbeknownst to most u.s. senators apparently harry reid, nancy pelosi and obama hid $105 billion worth of appropriations inside that gigantic health care bill and nancy pelosi said we'll have to pass the thing to find out what's in it. we're finding out what's in it and it has prefunded itself for the next eight years. often times they pass bills and fund it later. it's not very often they do it this way. here she is. >> the bad news is obamacare is prefunded for the next eight years. the implementation. we thought if we can't repeal it, at least -- >> you can defund it. >> at least we can defund it. >> you cannot defund it. >> no, it's done. it's done! >> there's no way to remedy this? >> yes, there is. that's the good news. the good news is we've got this two-week continuing resolution. government runs out of money on march 18th. this is what we propose. we've written language to add on to the next continuing resolution that says obama, pelosi, reid, you give this money back. you didn't tell the americ
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
of independence, and i know that is what you mean but there is no one picture of the u.s. in 1775, because there are so many different united states, if you will and it isn't the u.s. yet, they have the colonies and they have distinct cultures and economies. >> was there a similar political mood across all 13 colonies, in 1775? >> here we get to the issue, how could they ever act together? i think they could act together because they had the same political assumptions and political values and, they had a common enemy. there is nothing like an enemy to pull diverse elements together. and to the extent britain had begun to, first of all, to try to tax the colonies, although they weren't represented in parliament, and then, when the colonies resisted, followed with others, yes, they pulled together and understood the interest of any one colony was the interest of others, and if they could -- if britain could get by, for example, destroying the assembly of new york, because it had resisted a... refused to supply british troops, if they could do that in new york they could do that in any other
that the majority of the u.s. segment was brought up a piece by piece. it will be truly amazing. >> congratulations on a successful mission. the question will be for someone who wants to tackle it. i do not think people on the ground can appreciate what the living spaces are like in the space station. now that it is complete can you talk a little bit about how large it is and how much space you had to move around in? >> just to start off, this space station is the largest pressurized volume in place in history -- in space in the history. i use the word that my son uses, which isginormous -- is g inormous. it is equivalent to a seventh 47 or bigger. it is oppressive -- a 747 or better. we can use every single one of the walls or models in a way that we cannot do on the ground. it makes for a wonderful resource for science and living and being up here floating around. it is great. >> i have a question about garbage, literally. how much trash does the iss generate? where do you put it and do you recycle? >> we do recycle certain things. we recycle our water and -- our urine and turned it into water. t
tomorrow. .. with u.s. comptroller general jean dodaro. it pinpointed 34 areas from defense and job training to social services and safety for federal agencies have redundant programs. this is two hours and ten minutes. >> good morning. the committee meeting will come to order. >> as is the new tradition of this committee, we will begin by reading the oversight mission statement. we exist to secure to fundamental principles. first, americans have a right to know their money washington spends and takes is well spent and second, americans deserve an efficient, effective government that works for them. our duty on the oversight and government reform committee is to protect these rights. our solemn responsibility is to hold government accountable to tax payers because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. we will work tigers tirelessly with citizen watchdogs to deliver the facts to the american people and bring genuine reform to the federal bureaucracy. this is the mission of the oversight and government reform committee to read today's hearing is the secon
on the american revolution, "liberty," are so wonderful. i use that in my high school u.s. history classes. >> guest: that's wonderful. >> host: and this tweet is from a middle school history teacher. it seems it is not possible to determine original intent. your thoughts, please, and that's from chris. >> guest: well, depends on what you mean by original intent. as i've said earlier, scalia said he is not interested in original intent, that is that he's not interested in what people meant to say which is very difficult to determine. but in what they say in the meaning of the words of a given statute. i think, i think that it is useful to look, for jurists to look at what either the drafters or the ratifiers said about given provisions of the constitution. there you can, i think, find information that is of use. there is no original intent, there is no original understanding of the constitution as a whole, but usually the questions are much more specific. and you can find some information, but i see no reason to think that we are bound to understand those or to continue the provisions, to
. maier we have twitter.n fromit >> what was the significance of alexander hamilton's plan to exchange u.s. debt for the state that? >> guest: a profoundly important proposal. all of the unrest on the states was in part response to the taxation of the 1780s which they tried to retire they revolutionary war by the taxes on the way and that were a multiple before but it was a brilliant idea that they could have become national debt. those issuing bonds on the united states paid 4% instead of 6% and not have to take the principal offo immediately but just the interest. the revenue that was coming from the taxes on the imports plus the excise tax including the unfortunate one on whiskey, but he basically what he did was to relieve the states of ant o component of the budget which was the majority ofit whaty they were raising money for.oney when the state's head noio longern to have the taxes than the country became more peaceful. >> host: in the next call comes from dallas. >> caller: i am reading the history of propaganda in america by ewing and he speaks of a massive propaganda machine like
on possible military operations. gadhafi is promising to fight any no-fly zone, which he says proves the u.s. and other western nations are out to steal libya's oil. miguel marquez is on the scene in tripoli. miguel? >> reporter: good morning, george. moammar gadhafi is more confident this morning as the rebel advance in the east has been stopped in its tracks by his superior fire power. rebel forces have fallen back to the port city of ras lanuf and are digging in. now simply trying to hold their ground. a stunning turn of events. just days ago, rebel forces raced hundreds of miles towards tripoli. the momentum, with them. >> today, we can get ras lanuf. tomorrow, we will kill you everywhere in libya. >> reporter: anti-government protests broke in the capital and nearby towns. it looked like the end to one of the world's most bizarre authoritarian rulers. but dissent in and around tripoli is being violently crushed with everything such as riot police to tanks. in the capital where reporters cannot go, one said by phone, the fire is so heavy, the destruction so complete, it's like the town i
's at the greatest risk. it's their immigration problem rather more than the uk. maybe the u.s. and uk would play a part. i think people who advocate armed humanitarian intervention need to think quite widely about the kind of coalition that would be put together. >> yes, you had a question in the back. >> i'm maria, i'm a postgraduate student at the african studies. i've been very much following what's been happening in the past month, being from the middle east myself as well, and of course, it's very interesting. and my question is on something that i've been thinking about is the definition of how al-jazeera is defining the professionalism, so to say. the western ethics of journalism, and i put western between two quotations. i wanted to know your upon about how al-jazeera is kind of playing with the idea of distance, the emotional distance. it's not like any other channel. when you watch specific, you can use egypt and libya and tunisia, and i you feel like you are part of the news. al-jazeera has redefined the concept of coverage in the last events. and the other question is what do you thi
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